Washington Cannabis: Then and Now

By: Miguel “Miggy420” Miggy

Legalization is a semantic due to the fact people will do it anyways but its an important one because nobody wants to go to jail. Whether its medical or recreational, there needs to be a process that people are abiding by to be good neighbours.

The difference between buying cannabis as a patient in 2010 vs now as a consumer is Price vs Quality and the rebuilding culture in the State around cannabis.

Before I502 Recreational Marijuana, there was medical, an experiment that showed the inevitable open free market is suitable for all.

What medical provided was safe access to a plant that has killed no one. What the medical structure offered was a way for people not to get arrested. A system for residents of Washington State to be good citizens.

Before I502 there were cannabis markets and Cups, and other shenanigans that strictly involved Washington State citizens but now everyone is invited to the party or at least a mini vacation, and that’s not bad.

The sad part has been the prices for quality that one would call medicine, the lack of public safety consumption sites, and just the overall paranoia that still surrounds it as we fight for homegrow which is the bottom line in legalization.

Before I502 one had to provide a medical qualification as to why cannabis makes their day better, now one can walk to the store to acquire cannabis.

When medical marijuana was the rule of the land, I had options for my safer choice of recreational consumption. Instead of stopping at a bar and having a few drinks which could lead to terrible decisions, I could frequent my favourite dab bar, pay 3 to 4 dollars for a dab or two and then go on my way. This made me safer on the road and at home for have consumed less alcohol.

Before I502, every State citizen who chose to had an opportunity to be a part of the cannabis market/ industry in Washington.

During the days of early medical marijuana in Washington State, it took courage, residency, a medical prescription, some business savvy, and a passion for a plant to be in the cannabis business. Instead now, one needs courage and a business plan.

I would like to think that the days of social consumption, markets, craft cannabis, and community are not gone here in Washington State, when in fact we’ve just begun. As our laws

and views grow to a common sense approach, not just every Washingtonian will have an opportunity for a better life but every American.